Flu vaccination

The flu vaccine is a safe and effective vaccine. It's offered every year on the NHS to help protect people at risk of flu and its complications.
GP Surgery, Man in focus, in foreground to right, Doctor blurred, in background to left

Flu vaccine and coronavirus (COVID-19)

Flu vaccination is important because:

  • If you're at higher risk from coronavirus, you're also more at risk of problems from flu
  • If you get flu and coronavirus at the same time, research shows you're more likely to be seriously ill
  • It'll help to reduce pressure on the NHS and social care staff who may be dealing with coronavirus

If you've had COVID-19, it's safe to have the flu vaccine. It'll be effective at helping to prevent flu.

Who can have the flu vaccine?

The flu vaccine is given to people who:

  • Pregnant women
  • Children aged 2- 11 years old
  • Member of a shielding household
  • 65+ years old
  • Those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or who are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill
  • Have a long-term condition
    • a heart problem
    • a chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including bronchitis, emphysema or severe asthma
    • a kidney disease
    • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment (such as steroid medication or cancer treatment)
    • liver disease
    • had a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
    • diabetes
    • a neurological condition, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebral palsy
    • a learning disability
    • a problem with your spleen, e.g. sickle cell disease, or you have had your spleen removed
    • Are seriously overweight (BMI of 40 and above)

Frontline health and social care workers

Advice for people aged 50 to 64

If you're aged 50 to 64 and have a health condition that means you're more at risk from flu, you should get your flu vaccine as soon as possible.

Other 50- to 64-year-olds should be contacted about a flu vaccine later in the year.

Where to get the flu vaccine?

You can have the NHS flu vaccine at:

  • your GP surgery
  • a pharmacy offering the service
  • your midwifery service if you're pregnant

If you have your flu vaccine at a pharmacy, you do not have to tell the GP. The pharmacist should tell them.

All adult flu vaccines are given by injection into the muscle of the upper arm.

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